Please, just let me watch my Queer as Folk in peace!!

I was about to relax and start the first season of Queer as Folk. I had been looking forward to this for a long time — when I was in Florence, one of my roommates brought the fourth season, and with so few DVDs to watch in the apartment, all nine of us became fans of the show. (For the record, I was one of very few who were able to watch it without going, “Ewwwwwwww!” the whole time.)

So, after getting home from a surprisingly draining day off, I decided to relax and watch how the series began, courtesy of Netflix. And though I don’t usually read the summaries of the episodes before watching them, this time, I figured, “Why not? I’ll read it through.”

I am very sorry that I did.

After a night out at the club Babylon with Michael, Emmett and Ted; Brian picks up a cute guy named Justin for a night of fun, but afterwards coldly rebuffs Justin’s attempts to see him again.

Oh, God. Please. Don’t do this to me. You’re turning my hair gray.

Why is is there a semicolon after Ted?!

Semicolons are used to separate phrases that could stand on their own as complete sentences. After a night out at the club Babylon with Michael, Emmett and Ted is not a complete sentence.

I can just imagine the pitiable individual who wrote this up, thinking, “Wow, I’m going to be using a semicolon; look at how smart I am!” (Irony. I know.)

And then the editor probably glanced it over, then thought to himself, “Hey, look at that writer. He used a semicolon. Well, if he used a semicolon, he must be right!”

NO.

This is something that I see more and more often. People are smugly using semicolons, only to learn (or are they?) that they aren’t using them correctly.

Please, people, only use semicolons to separate what could be two complete sentences.

******EDIT******

Oh my God, I must continue.

From the summary of Episode Three:

Justin seeking to regain the attention of Brian decides to make himself noticed at Babylon.

Michael attempting to continue his straight act, runs into a co-worker in front of the gay bars.

Commas are missing after Justin, Brian and Michael.

And I’m not a fan of “co-worker” — I’m not quite sure what the rule is on that, but I much prefer “coworker.”

Ugh. Did anyone even edit these summaries?

Back to the show.

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