Category Archives: Entertainment

Great Grammar Example of the Day

“Yes. I am innocent … did not do drugs they’re not mine. I was almost hit by my assistant Tarin’s mom. I appreciate everyone giving me my privacy.”

–The classy, intelligent Lindsay Lohan, in an email to Access Hollywood‘s Billy Bush, on whether she has anything to say to the public.

Lohan was arrested early yesterday morning and charged with driving under the influence, cocaine possession, driving on a suspended license and transporting a narcotic into a custodial facility.

TMZ.com reports that, in conjunction with her other DUI arrest last May, she could be sentenced to a maximum of six years in prison.

Getting "Fitted" at Leo’s Beach

I watched The Beach tonight. I had ordered it from Netflix, and it had been sitting on top of my DVD player for at least a week. I know that many people scoff at this movie, but several backpackers on the Bootsnall travel forum have said that seeing The Beach had inspired them to travel.

Well, after seeing it, I think that it’s up there with Brokedown Palace at the top of the list of movies that will scare you out of taking that upcoming trip to Thailand.

Leonardo DiCaprio’s character narrated the film, and at one point, he recited the following sentence:

I was the only one with the overview of how it all fitted together.

That sentence jolted me out of my happy movie-coma. Fitted?

It sounded terrible. However, the more I thought about it, the more I doubted myself. It was supposed to be fit, wasn’t it? Or was fitted an appropriate past participle?

I turned to my beloved Google, and found some interesting insights on this page:

Here’s the big picture. Germanic languages each have a handful of verb
pairs (lie, lay; fall, fell) consisting of matched intransitive and transitive
counterparts sharing a common concept. The intransitives are irregular and the
transitives are regular. Transitive means having an noun object without need of
a preposition, as in “fell a tree”.English seems to have only four pairs left,
and the pair shine/shine is iffy.

fit, fit, fit; [irregular and intransitive]
fit, fitted, fitted [regular and transitive]

The other verbs are fall/fell, lie/lay, and shine.

This observant linguist, DaleC, points out that “fitted” is acceptable when referring to an object: fitting a shoe, for example. I fitted the shoe against his foot.

Since Leo was explaining a concept, rather than literally fitting an object, the word should have been fit, not fitted.

(You might be wondering if the screenwriters had intended for Leo’s character to use the word fitted, had intended for him to be incorrect. That might be true in other settings, but in this movie, I don’t think so. Leo spoke slowly, deliberately and with an intellectual air.)

I hope you have a good night.

If you’re in the mood for something weird, put on The Beach. I did enjoy it….but it was one of the stranger movies I’ve seen in recent memory. (If you want to see a truly fantastic film, rent Before Sunset, as long as you have seen Before Sunrise, of course. That movie knocked me over with its greatness.)

Getting "Fitted" at Leo’s Beach

I watched The Beach tonight. I had ordered it from Netflix, and it had been sitting on top of my DVD player for at least a week. I know that many people scoff at this movie, but several backpackers on the Bootsnall travel forum have said that seeing The Beach had inspired them to travel.

Well, after seeing it, I think that it’s up there with Brokedown Palace at the top of the list of movies that will scare you out of taking that upcoming trip to Thailand.

Leonardo DiCaprio’s character narrated the film, and at one point, he recited the following sentence:

I was the only one with the overview of how it all fitted together.

That sentence jolted me out of my happy movie-coma. Fitted?

It sounded terrible. However, the more I thought about it, the more I doubted myself. It was supposed to be fit, wasn’t it? Or was fitted an appropriate past participle?

I turned to my beloved Google, and found some interesting insights on this page:

Here’s the big picture. Germanic languages each have a handful of verb
pairs (lie, lay; fall, fell) consisting of matched intransitive and transitive
counterparts sharing a common concept. The intransitives are irregular and the
transitives are regular. Transitive means having an noun object without need of
a preposition, as in “fell a tree”.English seems to have only four pairs left,
and the pair shine/shine is iffy.

fit, fit, fit; [irregular and intransitive]
fit, fitted, fitted [regular and transitive]

The other verbs are fall/fell, lie/lay, and shine.

This observant linguist, DaleC, points out that “fitted” is acceptable when referring to an object: fitting a shoe, for example. I fitted the shoe against his foot.

Since Leo was explaining a concept, rather than literally fitting an object, the word should have been fit, not fitted.

(You might be wondering if the screenwriters had intended for Leo’s character to use the word fitted, had intended for him to be incorrect. That might be true in other settings, but in this movie, I don’t think so. Leo spoke slowly, deliberately and with an intellectual air.)

I hope you have a good night.

If you’re in the mood for something weird, put on The Beach. I did enjoy it….but it was one of the stranger movies I’ve seen in recent memory. (If you want to see a truly fantastic film, rent Before Sunset, as long as you have seen Before Sunrise, of course. That movie knocked me over with its greatness.)

A World of NO

I’m sorry for the oversaturation with People.com, but my friend Marie sent this to me, and it is SO bad that I have to repost it with corrections.

I never really mentioned it on here, but I’ve decided to avoid regular blogs. Why? I’m not quite sure. I don’t think that ANYONE deserves a pass, but the fact is….I like a lot of blogs with terrible grammar. I admire bloggers that work tirelessly to make us laugh, and in terms of inspiration, I don’t want to bite the hand that feeds me.

Off The Rack, however, is not one of my favorites. This is People Magazine’s official fashion blog. That puts it into the same category as journalism, in my book. Of all people, they should know best.

This is one of the worst examples I have EVER seen. Here we go:

Dita Von Teese’s Beauty Secrets

Dita von Teese is the ultimate in pin up girl beauty: flawless, milky white skin, perfectly tonged hair — and have you seen that body?! When PEOPLE caught up with her at a MAC Viva Glam event in London this week, we wanted to know all of her beauty secrets. “I do yoga and pilates” she revealed as her tiny frame wafted past in a silver mermaid-esque Dior gown. “I also do my best to get my beauty sleep which means knowing when the party is over!” And, how does she maintain that perfectly porcelain skin? “Sunscreen is very important but there isn’t one miracle cream, we’re all different.” After performing in a pink Swarovski crystal cow girl outfit (which off course was quickly removed) complete with crystal covered Christian Louboutin boots to perform her risqué burlesque style strip tease, she switched back her glamorous gown and went clubbing with her girlfriends, dutifully leaving at 1.30am, with a sneaky yawn on the way out. At least she practices what she preaches.

Sentence 1: Dita von Teese is the ultimate in pin up girl beauty: flawless, milky white skin, perfectly tonged hair — and have you seen that body?!

1) Pin up is incorrect — pinup is the term describing bombshell women of the 1940s whose posters provided tantalization for soldiers during World War II.

2) Flawless, milky white skin doesn’t work. The most correct version would be “flawless, milk-white skin” or “flawless, milky, white skin.” “Milky white” has become a bit of a colloquialism, so an argument could be made for that.

Sentence 2: When PEOPLE caught up with her at a MAC Viva Glam event in London this week, we wanted to know all of her beauty secrets.

No egregious errors. I’m not a fan of the writer’s style, though.

Sentence 3: “I do yoga and pilates” she revealed as her tiny frame wafted past in a silver mermaid-esque Dior gown.

3) You’re missing a comma. It should read, “I do yoga and pilates,” she revealed.

4) Tiny frame wafted past? Does a frame waft? I don’t think so. This writer got cruisazy with the thesaurus. (Don’t knock cruisazy. It’s one of my favorite words — you should see katesadventures.com! I’ve actually got a few of my friends saying it now.)

A better option would be to say, “She glided past, her tiny frame wrapped in a silver mermaid-esque Dior gown.” (Gorgeous gown. You should see the pictures. I love Dita’s fashion sense.)

Sentence 4: “I also do my best to get my beauty sleep which means knowing when the party is over!”

5) Put a comma between sleep and which. Personally, I would have thrown in, “she said with a laugh,” or something along those lines, even if she hadn’t been laughing, because the quote sounds a bit corny.

Sentence 5: And, how does she maintain that perfectly porcelain skin?

6) That comma is repugnant. It’s not enough to have “and” as its own entity at the beginning of a sentence. Although starting a sentence with the word “and” or “but” is frowned upon in literary circles, many writers (and I include myself in this category) do so, but do so with good style. This writer does not have good style — he or she has no idea what he or she is doing.

7) Porcelain is a noun, not an adjective, even though many claim it as an adjective when describing skin. Perfect porcelain would be a better way of putting it.

Sentence 6: “Sunscreen is very important but there isn’t one miracle cream, we’re all different.”

8) A comma is necessary between important and but. It may seem awkward at first, at least until you finish correcting the sentence, but trust me — this is necessary.

9) Lord, give me a semicolon! Just because people speak in incorrect grammar, it does not give you the license to write dialogue with incorrect grammar. Between cream and we’re, we should either have a semicolon or a period.

Sentence 7: After performing in a pink Swarovski crystal cow girl outfit (which off course was quickly removed) complete with crystal covered Christian Louboutin boots to perform her risqué burlesque style strip tease, she switched back her glamorous gown and went clubbing with her girlfriends, dutifully leaving at 1.30am, with a sneaky yawn on the way out.

10) Cow girl is incorrect. Cowgirl is the correct term.

11) Off course?! OFF COURSE?! Good grief, writer! You should be searching for a new job after word about this gets out, OF COURSE!

12) A comma is needed after the first parentheesis.

13) Crystal covered is incorrect. The boots are covered with crystals and are therefore crystal-covered.

14) I would have simply said burlesque, because burlesque style is incorrect. Another valid alternative would be burlesque-style.

15) Switched back her glamorous gown? That makes no sense. You don’t “switch back” a gown. You may switch back INTO a gown. Adding that word would have made a major improvement.

16) Strip tease is incorrect; striptease is what this grammar vandal is looking for.

17) 1.30am is crude at best. While I personally prefer to write 1:30 AM, most newspapers accept 1:30 a.m. as the correct form of writing time.

18) Leaving with a sneaky yawn, again, makes no sense. A sneaky yawn is not something with which you leave. And what kinds of yawns are sneaky? I’d say that she left, yawning LAZILY on her way out.

Sentence 8: At least she practices what she preaches.

Correct. And I have still not recovered from the last sentence.

18 errors in eight sentences, all of them confined to six sentences. Can you believe it?

People, I don’t know if you were being charitable by humoring a young writer or were being delusional in allowing this illiterate fool to write content for your website.

You should hire ME to write for you.

This is what you could have had:

Dita von Teese is the ultimate in pinup beauty: flawless skin, perfectly coiffed hair…and have you seen that body?! When PEOPLE caught up with her at a MAC Viva Glam event in London this week, we wanted to know all of her beauty secrets.

“I do yoga and pilates,” she revealed as she glided past, her tiny frame wrapped in a silver mermaid-esque Dior gown. “I also do my best to get my beauty sleep, which means knowing when the party is over!” she added with a laugh.

And how does she maintain that perfect porcelain skin?

“Sunscreen is very important, but there isn’t one miracle cream. We’re all different.”

After performing in a pink Swarovski crystal cowgirl outfit (which, of course, was quickly removed) — complete with crystal-encrusted Christian Louboutin boots — to perform her risqué burlesque striptease, she switched back into her glamorous gown and went clubbing with her girlfriends, dutifully leaving at 1:30 AM, yawning on the way out. At least she practices what she preaches.

I’m serious, People. Hire me. Email me your stuff. I’ll copyedit. You must be aware of how badly you’ve been doing lately in terms of errors. I could make a big difference in your work.

A World of NO

I’m sorry for the oversaturation with People.com, but my friend Marie sent this to me, and it is SO bad that I have to repost it with corrections.

I never really mentioned it on here, but I’ve decided to avoid regular blogs. Why? I’m not quite sure. I don’t think that ANYONE deserves a pass, but the fact is….I like a lot of blogs with terrible grammar. I admire bloggers that work tirelessly to make us laugh, and in terms of inspiration, I don’t want to bite the hand that feeds me.

Off The Rack, however, is not one of my favorites. This is People Magazine’s official fashion blog. That puts it into the same category as journalism, in my book. Of all people, they should know best.

This is one of the worst examples I have EVER seen. Here we go:

Dita Von Teese’s Beauty Secrets

Dita von Teese is the ultimate in pin up girl beauty: flawless, milky white skin, perfectly tonged hair — and have you seen that body?! When PEOPLE caught up with her at a MAC Viva Glam event in London this week, we wanted to know all of her beauty secrets. “I do yoga and pilates” she revealed as her tiny frame wafted past in a silver mermaid-esque Dior gown. “I also do my best to get my beauty sleep which means knowing when the party is over!” And, how does she maintain that perfectly porcelain skin? “Sunscreen is very important but there isn’t one miracle cream, we’re all different.” After performing in a pink Swarovski crystal cow girl outfit (which off course was quickly removed) complete with crystal covered Christian Louboutin boots to perform her risqué burlesque style strip tease, she switched back her glamorous gown and went clubbing with her girlfriends, dutifully leaving at 1.30am, with a sneaky yawn on the way out. At least she practices what she preaches.

Sentence 1: Dita von Teese is the ultimate in pin up girl beauty: flawless, milky white skin, perfectly tonged hair — and have you seen that body?!

1) Pin up is incorrect — pinup is the term describing bombshell women of the 1940s whose posters provided tantalization for soldiers during World War II.

2) Flawless, milky white skin doesn’t work. The most correct version would be “flawless, milk-white skin” or “flawless, milky, white skin.” “Milky white” has become a bit of a colloquialism, so an argument could be made for that.

Sentence 2: When PEOPLE caught up with her at a MAC Viva Glam event in London this week, we wanted to know all of her beauty secrets.

No egregious errors. I’m not a fan of the writer’s style, though.

Sentence 3: “I do yoga and pilates” she revealed as her tiny frame wafted past in a silver mermaid-esque Dior gown.

3) You’re missing a comma. It should read, “I do yoga and pilates,” she revealed.

4) Tiny frame wafted past? Does a frame waft? I don’t think so. This writer got cruisazy with the thesaurus. (Don’t knock cruisazy. It’s one of my favorite words — you should see katesadventures.com! I’ve actually got a few of my friends saying it now.)

A better option would be to say, “She glided past, her tiny frame wrapped in a silver mermaid-esque Dior gown.” (Gorgeous gown. You should see the pictures. I love Dita’s fashion sense.)

Sentence 4: “I also do my best to get my beauty sleep which means knowing when the party is over!”

5) Put a comma between sleep and which. Personally, I would have thrown in, “she said with a laugh,” or something along those lines, even if she hadn’t been laughing, because the quote sounds a bit corny.

Sentence 5: And, how does she maintain that perfectly porcelain skin?

6) That comma is repugnant. It’s not enough to have “and” as its own entity at the beginning of a sentence. Although starting a sentence with the word “and” or “but” is frowned upon in literary circles, many writers (and I include myself in this category) do so, but do so with good style. This writer does not have good style — he or she has no idea what he or she is doing.

7) Porcelain is a noun, not an adjective, even though many claim it as an adjective when describing skin. Perfect porcelain would be a better way of putting it.

Sentence 6: “Sunscreen is very important but there isn’t one miracle cream, we’re all different.”

8) A comma is necessary between important and but. It may seem awkward at first, at least until you finish correcting the sentence, but trust me — this is necessary.

9) Lord, give me a semicolon! Just because people speak in incorrect grammar, it does not give you the license to write dialogue with incorrect grammar. Between cream and we’re, we should either have a semicolon or a period.

Sentence 7: After performing in a pink Swarovski crystal cow girl outfit (which off course was quickly removed) complete with crystal covered Christian Louboutin boots to perform her risqué burlesque style strip tease, she switched back her glamorous gown and went clubbing with her girlfriends, dutifully leaving at 1.30am, with a sneaky yawn on the way out.

10) Cow girl is incorrect. Cowgirl is the correct term.

11) Off course?! OFF COURSE?! Good grief, writer! You should be searching for a new job after word about this gets out, OF COURSE!

12) A comma is needed after the first parentheesis.

13) Crystal covered is incorrect. The boots are covered with crystals and are therefore crystal-covered.

14) I would have simply said burlesque, because burlesque style is incorrect. Another valid alternative would be burlesque-style.

15) Switched back her glamorous gown? That makes no sense. You don’t “switch back” a gown. You may switch back INTO a gown. Adding that word would have made a major improvement.

16) Strip tease is incorrect; striptease is what this grammar vandal is looking for.

17) 1.30am is crude at best. While I personally prefer to write 1:30 AM, most newspapers accept 1:30 a.m. as the correct form of writing time.

18) Leaving with a sneaky yawn, again, makes no sense. A sneaky yawn is not something with which you leave. And what kinds of yawns are sneaky? I’d say that she left, yawning LAZILY on her way out.

Sentence 8: At least she practices what she preaches.

Correct. And I have still not recovered from the last sentence.

18 errors in eight sentences, all of them confined to six sentences. Can you believe it?

People, I don’t know if you were being charitable by humoring a young writer or were being delusional in allowing this illiterate fool to write content for your website.

You should hire ME to write for you.

This is what you could have had:

Dita von Teese is the ultimate in pinup beauty: flawless skin, perfectly coiffed hair…and have you seen that body?! When PEOPLE caught up with her at a MAC Viva Glam event in London this week, we wanted to know all of her beauty secrets.

“I do yoga and pilates,” she revealed as she glided past, her tiny frame wrapped in a silver mermaid-esque Dior gown. “I also do my best to get my beauty sleep, which means knowing when the party is over!” she added with a laugh.

And how does she maintain that perfect porcelain skin?

“Sunscreen is very important, but there isn’t one miracle cream. We’re all different.”

After performing in a pink Swarovski crystal cowgirl outfit (which, of course, was quickly removed) — complete with crystal-encrusted Christian Louboutin boots — to perform her risqué burlesque striptease, she switched back into her glamorous gown and went clubbing with her girlfriends, dutifully leaving at 1:30 AM, yawning on the way out. At least she practices what she preaches.

I’m serious, People. Hire me. Email me your stuff. I’ll copyedit. You must be aware of how badly you’ve been doing lately in terms of errors. I could make a big difference in your work.

Please, just let me watch my Queer as Folk in peace!!

I was about to relax and start the first season of Queer as Folk. I had been looking forward to this for a long time — when I was in Florence, one of my roommates brought the fourth season, and with so few DVDs to watch in the apartment, all nine of us became fans of the show. (For the record, I was one of very few who were able to watch it without going, “Ewwwwwwww!” the whole time.)

So, after getting home from a surprisingly draining day off, I decided to relax and watch how the series began, courtesy of Netflix. And though I don’t usually read the summaries of the episodes before watching them, this time, I figured, “Why not? I’ll read it through.”

I am very sorry that I did.

After a night out at the club Babylon with Michael, Emmett and Ted; Brian picks up a cute guy named Justin for a night of fun, but afterwards coldly rebuffs Justin’s attempts to see him again.

Oh, God. Please. Don’t do this to me. You’re turning my hair gray.

Why is is there a semicolon after Ted?!

Semicolons are used to separate phrases that could stand on their own as complete sentences. After a night out at the club Babylon with Michael, Emmett and Ted is not a complete sentence.

I can just imagine the pitiable individual who wrote this up, thinking, “Wow, I’m going to be using a semicolon; look at how smart I am!” (Irony. I know.)

And then the editor probably glanced it over, then thought to himself, “Hey, look at that writer. He used a semicolon. Well, if he used a semicolon, he must be right!”

NO.

This is something that I see more and more often. People are smugly using semicolons, only to learn (or are they?) that they aren’t using them correctly.

Please, people, only use semicolons to separate what could be two complete sentences.

******EDIT******

Oh my God, I must continue.

From the summary of Episode Three:

Justin seeking to regain the attention of Brian decides to make himself noticed at Babylon.

Michael attempting to continue his straight act, runs into a co-worker in front of the gay bars.

Commas are missing after Justin, Brian and Michael.

And I’m not a fan of “co-worker” — I’m not quite sure what the rule is on that, but I much prefer “coworker.”

Ugh. Did anyone even edit these summaries?

Back to the show.

Please, just let me watch my Queer as Folk in peace!!

I was about to relax and start the first season of Queer as Folk. I had been looking forward to this for a long time — when I was in Florence, one of my roommates brought the fourth season, and with so few DVDs to watch in the apartment, all nine of us became fans of the show. (For the record, I was one of very few who were able to watch it without going, “Ewwwwwwww!” the whole time.)

So, after getting home from a surprisingly draining day off, I decided to relax and watch how the series began, courtesy of Netflix. And though I don’t usually read the summaries of the episodes before watching them, this time, I figured, “Why not? I’ll read it through.”

I am very sorry that I did.

After a night out at the club Babylon with Michael, Emmett and Ted; Brian picks up a cute guy named Justin for a night of fun, but afterwards coldly rebuffs Justin’s attempts to see him again.

Oh, God. Please. Don’t do this to me. You’re turning my hair gray.

Why is is there a semicolon after Ted?!

Semicolons are used to separate phrases that could stand on their own as complete sentences. After a night out at the club Babylon with Michael, Emmett and Ted is not a complete sentence.

I can just imagine the pitiable individual who wrote this up, thinking, “Wow, I’m going to be using a semicolon; look at how smart I am!” (Irony. I know.)

And then the editor probably glanced it over, then thought to himself, “Hey, look at that writer. He used a semicolon. Well, if he used a semicolon, he must be right!”

NO.

This is something that I see more and more often. People are smugly using semicolons, only to learn (or are they?) that they aren’t using them correctly.

Please, people, only use semicolons to separate what could be two complete sentences.

******EDIT******

Oh my God, I must continue.

From the summary of Episode Three:

Justin seeking to regain the attention of Brian decides to make himself noticed at Babylon.

Michael attempting to continue his straight act, runs into a co-worker in front of the gay bars.

Commas are missing after Justin, Brian and Michael.

And I’m not a fan of “co-worker” — I’m not quite sure what the rule is on that, but I much prefer “coworker.”

Ugh. Did anyone even edit these summaries?

Back to the show.

Who’s vs. Whose Explained SO Well!

I’m a fan of the HBO show Big Love, a drama about a polygamist family trying to live a normal life in present-day Utah. (If you haven’t seen it, I highly recommend it. If I know you, I’d be happy to lend you the DVDs!) Unfortunately, I don’t get HBO, so I missed the season premiere.

This morning, I decided to read the review anyway, since it’s been about a year since the season finale took place. I’d been dying to know what happened next!

Shirley Halperin wrote the review for EW.com. And Shirley Halperin is a goddess. In one swift, deft move, and probably without intention, she demonstrated the way to use the words “who’s” and “whose.”

Outed but Not Down
By Shirley Halperin

This creates the perfect opportunity for good old Nicki to step in, step up, and save the day. Which is what makes her such a fascinating character: Is she the sacrificial lamb or the one who brings the lamb to slaughter? From her back-and-forth bickering with Margene over who’s going shopping, who’s taking the kids to school, who’s making dinner, and whose turn it is to satisfy Bill later that night (okay, that last one didn’t happen on this particular show), it looks like she’s trying all angles, as usual.

Oh, that is beautiful.

BEAUTIFUL.

Shirley Halperin, you are a deity, a mermaid, and one classy broad. If I ever meet you, I’d be glad to buy you a coffee.

One of my biggest gripes is when people mix up “who’s” and “whose.” I’m about to explain the rules regarding these words, but after Shirley Halperin’s stunning explanation, I barely need to go into depth. A short rundown is fine.

“Who’s” is the conjuction of “who is” or “who has.”

“Whose” refers to possession.

Examples:

I don’t know whose legwarmers these are, but I’m throwing them in the trash on principle alone!

Mary didn’t want to speak with Carla, whose medication caused her to growl like a bear at the slightest hint of displeasure.

I don’t know who’s going to attend the date auction, but if I were sixteen again, I would bet on A.C. Slater so fast, it would make your head spin!

I beg you to tell me who’s been emptying the vodka bottle and refilling it with water; believe me, vodka alone does not freeze!

Learn it. Live it.

Shirley Halperin, I am so glad I clicked on that Big Love review this morning. I am very proud of your writing. If I may go out on a limb, I think that you may have inadvertently changed someone’s bad grammar habits for the better! You get a gold star.

People Magazine is Being RUINED

Munmun O’Neill, I don’t know you. After reading your embarrassingly bad story on the birth of tennis player Lindsay Davenport’s new baby boy, I hope that I never meet you.

It’s obvious that you haven’t been in your job for long. Who could make errors like these and still keep a job in the writing field — or ANY field?!

The quality of the stories published on People.com used to be impeccable. Errors were nowhere to be found, and the journalistic tone was perfect — friendly enough for middle-aged Midwestern housewives to get their soft news fix each week, but professional enough for the intellectual and intelligent to appreciate as a credible news source.

That isn’t happening anymore.

The quality has gone down quickly and sharply. I have a theory about that. Though many big stories are initially published on People.com, the site has to compete with celebrity blogs like Perez Hilton and TMZ, and my personal favorite, Dlisted. I think that in the world of blogs, where timeliness is essential, the magazine has cut off some of its steps to publication in favor of getting the news out as soon as possible.

Being a competitor for celebrity blogs may have also affected their standards for hiring writers, but I doubt that. I would imagine that getting a job writing for People is such a great job that only the very best writers would be hired.

As a result, stories like the following get published:

Tennis Star Lindsay Davenport Has a Boy
By Munmun O’Neill

Tennis star Lindsay Davenport can now add motherhood to her list of impressive titles.

On Sunday, Davenport and her husband, Jonathan Leach, welcomed thier first child, a son named Jagger Jonathan Leach, her rep confirms. The baby, who weighed in 8 lbs., 1 oz, was born at 6:15 p.m. in Newport Beach, Calif.

“Lindsay and Jon are ecstatic and Jagger is healthy and doing great,” Davenport’s agent, Ted Godsick, told PEOPLE Tuesday.

Davenport, 31, and Leach, got married in 2003. They announced they were expecting in December of last year. The pregnancy prevented Davenport from competing this season.

I’m so disgusted, I can barely look at the page. And it’s not because of the kid’s name.

Who, in this day and age, spells the word “their” incorrectly?! Oh my God!! I honestly think that I may vomit.

There are still tons and tons of people, most of whom are not professional writers, who mix up “their,” “there” and “they’re.” While that is unforgivable in itself, it seems even worse that a professional writer would mess up the spelling!

The next sentence involves the usage of an extraneous comma. The comma after Leach is inexcusable. It’s terrible; it reminds me of reading classmates’ essays in middle school.

Davenport has an age, but Leach clearly does not. To make the sentence correct, it would be best to remove the extraneous comma.

Even if the comma weren’t there, however, the sentence would still be awkward. Either both or neither ages should be listed. I would change it to, “Davenport and Leach were married in 2003,” or maybe, “Davenport and Leach married in 2003.”

“Got married” sounds awkward. It’s tough to make the word “got” sound professional.

I may be a bit unfair in placing all of the blame on Munmun O’Neill. Even though her name appears on this story, she surely had an editorial board to get through, even if it was just one editor. How could any editor, in any field, anywhere in the Anglophone world, miss these atrocious errors?

Still, I highly doubt that Munmun O’Neill had a perfect story that an editor intentionally changed to be incorrect. And for that reason, Munmun O’Neill, you have been flagged by the Grammar Vandal.

Who’s vs. Whose Explained SO Well!

I’m a fan of the HBO show Big Love, a drama about a polygamist family trying to live a normal life in present-day Utah. (If you haven’t seen it, I highly recommend it. If I know you, I’d be happy to lend you the DVDs!) Unfortunately, I don’t get HBO, so I missed the season premiere.

This morning, I decided to read the review anyway, since it’s been about a year since the season finale took place. I’d been dying to know what happened next!

Shirley Halperin wrote the review for EW.com. And Shirley Halperin is a goddess. In one swift, deft move, and probably without intention, she demonstrated the way to use the words “who’s” and “whose.”

Outed but Not Down
By Shirley Halperin

This creates the perfect opportunity for good old Nicki to step in, step up, and save the day. Which is what makes her such a fascinating character: Is she the sacrificial lamb or the one who brings the lamb to slaughter? From her back-and-forth bickering with Margene over who’s going shopping, who’s taking the kids to school, who’s making dinner, and whose turn it is to satisfy Bill later that night (okay, that last one didn’t happen on this particular show), it looks like she’s trying all angles, as usual.

Oh, that is beautiful.

BEAUTIFUL.

Shirley Halperin, you are a deity, a mermaid, and one classy broad. If I ever meet you, I’d be glad to buy you a coffee.

One of my biggest gripes is when people mix up “who’s” and “whose.” I’m about to explain the rules regarding these words, but after Shirley Halperin’s stunning explanation, I barely need to go into depth. A short rundown is fine.

“Who’s” is the conjuction of “who is” or “who has.”

“Whose” refers to possession.

Examples:

I don’t know whose legwarmers these are, but I’m throwing them in the trash on principle alone!

Mary didn’t want to speak with Carla, whose medication caused her to growl like a bear at the slightest hint of displeasure.

I don’t know who’s going to attend the date auction, but if I were sixteen again, I would bet on A.C. Slater so fast, it would make your head spin!

I beg you to tell me who’s been emptying the vodka bottle and refilling it with water; believe me, vodka alone does not freeze!

Learn it. Live it.

Shirley Halperin, I am so glad I clicked on that Big Love review this morning. I am very proud of your writing. If I may go out on a limb, I think that you may have inadvertently changed someone’s bad grammar habits for the better! You get a gold star.

People Magazine is Being RUINED

Munmun O’Neill, I don’t know you. After reading your embarrassingly bad story on the birth of tennis player Lindsay Davenport’s new baby boy, I hope that I never meet you.

It’s obvious that you haven’t been in your job for long. Who could make errors like these and still keep a job in the writing field — or ANY field?!

The quality of the stories published on People.com used to be impeccable. Errors were nowhere to be found, and the journalistic tone was perfect — friendly enough for middle-aged Midwestern housewives to get their soft news fix each week, but professional enough for the intellectual and intelligent to appreciate as a credible news source.

That isn’t happening anymore.

The quality has gone down quickly and sharply. I have a theory about that. Though many big stories are initially published on People.com, the site has to compete with celebrity blogs like Perez Hilton and TMZ, and my personal favorite, Dlisted. I think that in the world of blogs, where timeliness is essential, the magazine has cut off some of its steps to publication in favor of getting the news out as soon as possible.

Being a competitor for celebrity blogs may have also affected their standards for hiring writers, but I doubt that. I would imagine that getting a job writing for People is such a great job that only the very best writers would be hired.

As a result, stories like the following get published:

Tennis Star Lindsay Davenport Has a Boy
By Munmun O’Neill

Tennis star Lindsay Davenport can now add motherhood to her list of impressive titles.

On Sunday, Davenport and her husband, Jonathan Leach, welcomed thier first child, a son named Jagger Jonathan Leach, her rep confirms. The baby, who weighed in 8 lbs., 1 oz, was born at 6:15 p.m. in Newport Beach, Calif.

“Lindsay and Jon are ecstatic and Jagger is healthy and doing great,” Davenport’s agent, Ted Godsick, told PEOPLE Tuesday.

Davenport, 31, and Leach, got married in 2003. They announced they were expecting in December of last year. The pregnancy prevented Davenport from competing this season.

I’m so disgusted, I can barely look at the page. And it’s not because of the kid’s name.

Who, in this day and age, spells the word “their” incorrectly?! Oh my God!! I honestly think that I may vomit.

There are still tons and tons of people, most of whom are not professional writers, who mix up “their,” “there” and “they’re.” While that is unforgivable in itself, it seems even worse that a professional writer would mess up the spelling!

The next sentence involves the usage of an extraneous comma. The comma after Leach is inexcusable. It’s terrible; it reminds me of reading classmates’ essays in middle school.

Davenport has an age, but Leach clearly does not. To make the sentence correct, it would be best to remove the extraneous comma.

Even if the comma weren’t there, however, the sentence would still be awkward. Either both or neither ages should be listed. I would change it to, “Davenport and Leach were married in 2003,” or maybe, “Davenport and Leach married in 2003.”

“Got married” sounds awkward. It’s tough to make the word “got” sound professional.

I may be a bit unfair in placing all of the blame on Munmun O’Neill. Even though her name appears on this story, she surely had an editorial board to get through, even if it was just one editor. How could any editor, in any field, anywhere in the Anglophone world, miss these atrocious errors?

Still, I highly doubt that Munmun O’Neill had a perfect story that an editor intentionally changed to be incorrect. And for that reason, Munmun O’Neill, you have been flagged by the Grammar Vandal.