Category Archives: Movies

We’ve got another one!

I’m still trying to recover from the atrocity from last winter.

Now, we’ve got another film with a grammatically incorrect title:

What Just Happened

I have to admit, it’s got a fantastic cast.  Robert DeNiro, Catherine Keener, Stanley Tucci, Bruce Willis…(unlike most, I won’t include Sean Penn because I’m still miffed that he stole Bill Murray’s Oscar for Lost in Translation).

But COME ON!

Where is the question mark?

Is that little award thing to the right of the title supposed to be a question mark?

What does the movie get out of omitting punctuation in the title? A cleaner-looking title (much like Dirty Sexy Money)?

Will the movie rake in more money without the question mark?

Your thoughts, please.

The Soup’s take on How She Move

Reader Lisa sent me this awesome video of The Soup‘s interpretation of the film How She Move:

Love it!

In other news, I bought a new camera today — the Olympus FE-280, which I enjoyed immensely before losing it on New Year’s Eve — and will be trying it out at the Spice Girls concert tomorrow night!  :-) That means that there will be plenty of new pictures of local errors and grammar vandalism!

Thanks, Lisa.

The Academy Awards are coming out, and….

Academy Award nominations were announced yesterday.  If you know me, you know that I go Oscar-crazy every year, trying to see as many nominated movies as possible — I even create weird mathematical formulas that figure out which films have the most overall importance!

Anyway, I digress.  This has to do with grammar, I swear.

Every news outlet has been reporting that three nominations went to Sweeney Todd the Barber of Fleet Street.

Seriously.  Every single news outlet.

Not Sweeney Todd, the Barber of Fleet Street.  Not Sweeney Todd: the Barber of Fleet Street.

Please, please punctuate that correctly!  Defy the powers that be!  Use correct grammar!

johnnydeppsweeneytoddinchair.jpg

It’s crossing over into film titles!

My friend Alexa directed me to this horrifying movie poster:

Yikes. I’m not a fan of the title.

The worst part is that a title with perfect grammar could have been easy — only they chose to do this. Having this title does not add anything to the movie. That’s my opinion on the matter.

One complication is that it can be argued that “How She Move” is a colloquialism. What are your thoughts on that?

Thanks, Alexa. If you’re a fan of funny news, Knut, Overheard in New York or right-wing rhetoric — or any combination thereof — check out her blog, Alexa Shrugged.

Getting "Fitted" at Leo’s Beach

I watched The Beach tonight. I had ordered it from Netflix, and it had been sitting on top of my DVD player for at least a week. I know that many people scoff at this movie, but several backpackers on the Bootsnall travel forum have said that seeing The Beach had inspired them to travel.

Well, after seeing it, I think that it’s up there with Brokedown Palace at the top of the list of movies that will scare you out of taking that upcoming trip to Thailand.

Leonardo DiCaprio’s character narrated the film, and at one point, he recited the following sentence:

I was the only one with the overview of how it all fitted together.

That sentence jolted me out of my happy movie-coma. Fitted?

It sounded terrible. However, the more I thought about it, the more I doubted myself. It was supposed to be fit, wasn’t it? Or was fitted an appropriate past participle?

I turned to my beloved Google, and found some interesting insights on this page:

Here’s the big picture. Germanic languages each have a handful of verb
pairs (lie, lay; fall, fell) consisting of matched intransitive and transitive
counterparts sharing a common concept. The intransitives are irregular and the
transitives are regular. Transitive means having an noun object without need of
a preposition, as in “fell a tree”.English seems to have only four pairs left,
and the pair shine/shine is iffy.

fit, fit, fit; [irregular and intransitive]
fit, fitted, fitted [regular and transitive]

The other verbs are fall/fell, lie/lay, and shine.

This observant linguist, DaleC, points out that “fitted” is acceptable when referring to an object: fitting a shoe, for example. I fitted the shoe against his foot.

Since Leo was explaining a concept, rather than literally fitting an object, the word should have been fit, not fitted.

(You might be wondering if the screenwriters had intended for Leo’s character to use the word fitted, had intended for him to be incorrect. That might be true in other settings, but in this movie, I don’t think so. Leo spoke slowly, deliberately and with an intellectual air.)

I hope you have a good night.

If you’re in the mood for something weird, put on The Beach. I did enjoy it….but it was one of the stranger movies I’ve seen in recent memory. (If you want to see a truly fantastic film, rent Before Sunset, as long as you have seen Before Sunrise, of course. That movie knocked me over with its greatness.)

Getting "Fitted" at Leo’s Beach

I watched The Beach tonight. I had ordered it from Netflix, and it had been sitting on top of my DVD player for at least a week. I know that many people scoff at this movie, but several backpackers on the Bootsnall travel forum have said that seeing The Beach had inspired them to travel.

Well, after seeing it, I think that it’s up there with Brokedown Palace at the top of the list of movies that will scare you out of taking that upcoming trip to Thailand.

Leonardo DiCaprio’s character narrated the film, and at one point, he recited the following sentence:

I was the only one with the overview of how it all fitted together.

That sentence jolted me out of my happy movie-coma. Fitted?

It sounded terrible. However, the more I thought about it, the more I doubted myself. It was supposed to be fit, wasn’t it? Or was fitted an appropriate past participle?

I turned to my beloved Google, and found some interesting insights on this page:

Here’s the big picture. Germanic languages each have a handful of verb
pairs (lie, lay; fall, fell) consisting of matched intransitive and transitive
counterparts sharing a common concept. The intransitives are irregular and the
transitives are regular. Transitive means having an noun object without need of
a preposition, as in “fell a tree”.English seems to have only four pairs left,
and the pair shine/shine is iffy.

fit, fit, fit; [irregular and intransitive]
fit, fitted, fitted [regular and transitive]

The other verbs are fall/fell, lie/lay, and shine.

This observant linguist, DaleC, points out that “fitted” is acceptable when referring to an object: fitting a shoe, for example. I fitted the shoe against his foot.

Since Leo was explaining a concept, rather than literally fitting an object, the word should have been fit, not fitted.

(You might be wondering if the screenwriters had intended for Leo’s character to use the word fitted, had intended for him to be incorrect. That might be true in other settings, but in this movie, I don’t think so. Leo spoke slowly, deliberately and with an intellectual air.)

I hope you have a good night.

If you’re in the mood for something weird, put on The Beach. I did enjoy it….but it was one of the stranger movies I’ve seen in recent memory. (If you want to see a truly fantastic film, rent Before Sunset, as long as you have seen Before Sunrise, of course. That movie knocked me over with its greatness.)